About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. a farewell for hillary clinton. i'm fighting a fiscal cough, so pardon that. if it's always darkest. it's clear the white house-re house-republican leaders, both sides appear to be very far apart, saluting kennedy center honorees from dustin hoffman to led zeppelin and hitting the golf links with former president bill clinton. the guy with whom he will have to make a deal to end the standoff on the fiscal cliff house speaker john boehner requested time on fox news to publicly declare the president's opening bid a nonstarter. >> i was flabbergasted. we're nowhere. >> treasury secretary tim geithner did the full ginsberg with taped appearances on all five shows. nothing will happen until budget tax rates and the ball is now in their court. >> the only thing that stands in the way of a deal right now is if a group of republican members decide there have been a block because they can't afford the wealthiest 2% of americans. >> how much is theater and how much are the two sides locked into positions that remain far apart? the president's plan called for higher tax rates on the wealthiest ame
that we should go back to the rates that we had when bill clinton was president. i want to reform the tax codes so that it's simple, fair, and asks the wealthiest households to pay taxes on incomes over $250,000. the same rate we had when bill clinton was president. we have to ask you and me and the wealthiest among us to go back to the clinton rates for income above $250,000. >> the clinton tax rates, we need to go back to the clinton tax rates. that's not a generic policy idea. that's really specific. the clinton tax rate for high income earners was 39.6%. that's what president obama was calling for during the campaign. that's still what president obama is calling for now. but now when you ask him if that's the red line, if you ask if he will accept anything else, he doesn't really answer. >> tax rates. are you -- is there no deal at the end of the year if tax rates for the top 2% aren't the clinton tax rates, period. no ifs, ands or buts, any room to negotiate, on that specific aspect of the fiscal cliff. >> with respect to the tax rates, i want to emphasize, i am open to new ideas. i'
in the middle of the night in 1996 and signed very reluctant lie by president clinton and e sin essentially says one state does not have to recognize the marriage equality rights another state may give. if you are married legally in the state of massachusetts and you happen to reside -- this is as a gay couple -- and you happen to reside in the state of california, the state of california does not need to recognize your massachusetts marriage, and as a result there are over 1,000 benefits that can be denied to a legally married gay couple if they happen to be living in a state that doesn't recognize gay marriage. my guess is the supreme court will declare that unconstitutional because there is a long tradition under the privileges and immunities clause of the constitution that says one state recognizes the contract rights that are given in another state. so i think that doma law goes by the wayside. the second question is an equal protection question and goes specifically at the california referendum which -- >> the proposition 8. >> the proposition, proposition 8, which makes it illegal under c
.6% rate of the clinton years? he did not. so is there a little give ultimately to sort of say what if it doesn't go up to 39.6%, but say 37%, is that something the white house would accept? also, this that same interview, the president raised the possibility, which is that after you do tax reform and you close loopholes and deductions, that if the rate is raised, the top rate, there's always a possibility that after you do tax reform, of course, the top rate would then go down again. so it was -- you have to listen to the president very carefully to see where there might be some give. the problem from my point of view is that everybody knows what's got to be done in the long-term. it's the question of the short-term deal. >> john boehner, speaker of the house, he came up with a proposal. but not all the conservatives in the house and the senate are on board. jim demint, republican senator from south carolina. >> this is a time to negotiate with ourselves. we need to invite the president to work with us. his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table un
of state hillary clinton held a news conference. keep in mind, russia here, really, resisted the efforts to speed the departure of the syrian leader al assad. so jill, do we know, was syria's chemical weapons, was that discussed here in this conversation between the secretary of state and the foreign minister of russia? >> reporter: well, yes. initially. there are actually two meetings between secretary clinton and the foreign minister. and you know, russia actually does -- this is one area where they do agree. russia is very much opposed to any type of use of chemical weapons and in fact secretary clinton thanked him for speaking about that which she did in brussels just yesterday, talking about that. although, brooke, you know, you have to say that the russians next breath say that they have raised that issue, in fact, with bashar al assad. the president of syria. and he assures them that there's no use intended and it is not a problem and, so, you kind of have two messages coming from the russians but you would have to say they're very much opposed to that and a lot of concern. >> so
with secretary hillary clinton discussing the possibility of a syria without assad in power. >> wow. >> this morning rebels have declared damascus's airport a military target, warning civilians and airlines not to approach it. >> richard, that's what we're looking at. we're looking at russia to see when russia finally gives up on assad. if they are, in fact, coming close, it's over. he's done. >> that's the beginning of the end. and i think that's finally in play. brahimi who preceded kofi annan trying to do a diplomatic process finally, i think, has something to work with. it's the possibility of the threat that the syrian regime might turn to chemical munitions, and the russians realize that would be the equivalent of jumping and that their long-term equities. the russians realize that would be too far, not on moral grounds, but on real politic rounds. so the chances of telling the syrians don't do it, but the russians saying if you do it, you won't be supported. and possibly giving him a way out before he thinks -- before he makes the decision whether to do it. this has all come
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)